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 Business/Tourist Visa

Overview

The B-1/B-2 visitor visa is for people traveling to the United States temporarily for business (B-1) or for pleasure or medical treatment (B-2). Generally, the B-1 visa is for travelers consulting with business associates, attending scientific, educational, professional or business conventions/conferences, settling an estate or negotiating contracts. The B-2 visa is for travel that is recreational in nature, including tourism, visits with friends or relatives, medical treatment and activities of a fraternal, social or service nature. Often, the B-1 and B-2 visas are combined and issued as one visa: the B-1/B-2.

Qualifications

If you apply for a B-1/B-2 visa, you must demonstrate to a consular officer that you qualify for a U.S. visa in accordance with the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). Section 214(b) of the INA presumes that every B-1/B-2 applicant is an intending immigrant. You must overcome this legal presumption by showing:

  • That the purpose of your trip to the United States is for a temporary visit, such as business, pleasure, or medical treatment
  • That you plan to remain in the United States for a specific, limited period of time
  • Evidence of funds to cover your expenses while in the United States
  • That you have a residence outside the United States, as well as other binding social or economic ties, that will ensure your return abroad at the end of your visit

Personal or domestic employees and crew members working aboard vessels within the Outer Continental Shelf may qualify for B-1 visas under certain circumstances.

Some foreign nationals may be ineligible for visas according to The Immigration and Nationality Act. You can read more about The Immigration and Nationality Act and visa ineligibility here.

Application Items

If you apply for a business/tourist visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • A receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page

Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one photograph taken within the last six months and your current and all old passports. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is of concern, the applicant should bring the documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make this information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of the information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview. Original documents are always preferred over photocopies and you must bring these documents with you to the interview. Do not fax, email or mail any supporting documents to the U.S. Embassy

  • Current proof of income, tax payments, property or business ownership, or assets.
  • Your travel itinerary and/or other explanation about your planned trip.
  • A letter from your employer detailing your position, salary, how long you have been employed, any authorized vacation, and the business purpose, if any, of your U.S. trip.
  • Criminal/court records pertaining to any arrest or conviction anywhere, even if you completed your sentence or were later pardoned.

Additionally, based on your purpose of travel, you should consider bringing the following:

Students

Bring your latest school results, transcripts and degrees/diplomas. Also bring evidence of financial support such as monthly bank statements, fixed deposit slips, or other evidence.

Working adults

Bring an employment letter from your employer and pay slips from the most recent three months.

Businessmen and company directors

Bring evidence of your position in the company and remuneration.

Visiting a relative

Bring photocopies of your relative’s proof of status (e.g. Green Card, naturalization certificate, valid visa, etc).

Previous visitors to the United States

If you were previously in the United States, any documents attesting to your immigration or visa status.

Supporting Documents for Applicants Seeking Medical Care

If you wish to travel to the United States for medical treatment, then you should be prepared to present the following documentation in addition to the documents listed above and those the consular officer may require:

  • A medical diagnosis from a local physician explaining the nature of your ailment and the reason you require treatment in the United States.
  • A letter from a physician or medical facility in the United States expressing a willingness to treat this specific ailment and detailing the projected length and cost of treatment (including doctors’ fees, hospitalization fees, and all medical-related expenses).
  • A statement of financial responsibility from the individuals or organization paying for your transportation, medical and living expenses. The individuals guaranteeing payment of these expenses must provide proof of their ability to do so, often in the form of bank or other statements of income/savings or certified copies of income tax returns.

More Information

For more information about business and tourist visas, visit the Department of State’s website.


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Student Visa

Overview

The United States welcomes foreign citizens who come to the United States to study. Before applying for a visa, all student visa applicants are required to be accepted and approved by their school or program. Once accepted, educational institutions will provide each applicant the necessary approval documentation to be submitted when applying for a student visa.

Visa Descriptions and Qualifications

F-1 Visa

This is the most common type of student visa. If you wish to engage in academic studies in the United States at an approved school, such as an accredited U.S. college or university, private secondary school, or approved English language program then you need an F-1 visa. You will also need an F-1 visa if your course of study is more than 18 hours a week.

M-1 Visa

If you plan engage in non-academic or vocational study or training at a U.S. institution then you need an M-1 visa.

More information about each of these visas and opportunities for studying in the United States can be found at the Education USA website.

U.S. Public Schools

U.S. law does not permit foreign students to attend public elementary school (kindergarten to 8th grade) or a publicly funded adult education program. Hence, F-1 visas cannot be issued for study at such schools.

An F-1 visa can be issued for attendance at a public secondary school (grades 9 to 12), but the student is limited to a maximum of 12 months at the school. The school must also indicate on the Form I-20 that the student has paid the unsubsidized cost of the education and the amount submitted by the student for that purpose.

For more information about F-1 legal requirements, visit the Department of State website.

Note: Holders of A, E, F-2, G, H-4, J-2, L-2, M-2 or other derivative nonimmigrant visas may enroll in public elementary and secondary schools.

Student Assistance, Finding a U.S. School

Students who hope to enroll in an American educational institution are encouraged to contact EducationUSAdoha@state.gov and visit educationusa.info/.

Application Items

To apply for an F or M visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • A receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • An approved Form I-20 from your U.S. school or program.
  • A Form I-901 SEVIS fee receipt indicating you paid the SEVIS fee. The SEVIS website has more information.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one photograph taken within the last six months, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview:

  • Documents demonstrating strong financial, social, and family ties to your home country that will compel you to return to your country after your program of study in the United States ends.
  • Financial and any other documents you believe will support your application and which give credible evidence that you have enough readily-available funds to meet all expenses for the first year of study and that you have access to funds sufficient to cover all expenses while you remain in the United States. M-1 applicants must demonstrate the ability to pay all tuition and living costs for the entire period of their intended stay.
  • Photocopies of bank statements will not be accepted unless you can also show original copies of bank statements or original bank books.
  • If you are financially sponsored by another person, bring proof of your relationship to the sponsor (such as your birth certificate), the sponsor’s most recent original tax forms and the sponsor’s bankbooks and/or fixed deposit certificates.
  • Academic documents that show scholastic preparation. Useful documents include school transcripts (original copies are preferred) with grades, public examination certificates (A-levels, etc.), standardized test scores (SAT, TOEFL, etc.), and diplomas.

Dependents

Spouses and/or unmarried children under the age of 21 who wish to accompany or join the principal visa holder in the United States for the duration of his or her stay require derivative F or M visas. There is no derivative visa for the parents of F or M holders.

Family members who do not intend to reside in the United States with the principal visa holder, but wish to visit for vacations only, may be eligible to apply for visitor (B-2) visas.

Spouses and dependents may not work in the United States on a derivative F or M visa. If your spouse/child seeks employment, the spouse must obtain the appropriate work visa.

Supporting Documents for Dependents

Applicants with dependents must also provide:

  • Proof of the student’s relationship to his or her spouse and/or child (e.g., marriage and birth certificates)

It is preferred that families apply for their visas at the same time, but if the spouse and/or child must apply separately at a later time, they should bring a copy of the student visa holder’s passport and visa, along with all other required documents.

Other Information

Optional Practical Training (OPT)

F-1 visa holders may be eligible for up to 12 months of optional practical training following completion of all course requirements for graduation (not including thesis or equivalent), or after completion of all requirements. OPT is separate from a student’s academic work, and time for OPT will not normally be reflected during the student’s academic program or in the completed study date. Students applying for an F visa to do OPT may present an I-20 with an original end of study date that may have passed. However, these I-20s must be annotated by the designated school official to reflect approval of an OPT program that extends beyond the end of the regular period of study. In addition, the student must have proof that USCIS has approved their practical training program or that an application is pending, either in the form of an approved Employment Authorization Card or a Form I-797 indicating that s/he has a pending application for an OPT program.

Validity of Student Visas After a Break in Studies

Students who are away from classes for more than five months can expect to apply for and receive a new F-1 or M-1 student visa to return to school following travel abroad, as explained below.

Students within the United States.

A student (F-1 or M-1) may lose that status if they do not resume studies within five months of the date of transferring schools or programs, under immigration law. If a student loses status, unless USCIS reinstates the student’s status, the student’s F or M visa would also be invalid for future travel returning to the United States. For more information see the USCIS website, and instructions for Application for Extend/Change of Nonimmigrant Status Form I-539 to request reinstatement of status.

Students – Returning to the United States from Travel Abroad

Students who leave the United States for a break in studies of five months or more may lose their F-1 or M-1 status unless their activities overseas are related to their course of study. In advance of travel, students may want to check with their designated school official, if there is a question about whether their activity is related to their course of study.

When the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) immigration inspector at port of entry is presented a previously used, unexpired F-1 or M-1 visa by a returning student who has been outside the United States and out of student status for more than five months, a CBP immigration inspector may find the student inadmissible for not possessing a valid nonimmigrant visa. CBP may also cancel the visa after granting the student permission to withdraw the application for admission. Therefore, it is prudent for students to apply for new visas at a U.S. Embassy abroad prior to traveling to the United States to return to their studies, after an absence of more than five months that is not related to their course of study.

Exchange Visitor Visa

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The United States welcomes foreign citizens who come to the United States to participate in exchange programs. Before applying for a visa, all exchange visitor applicants are required to be accepted and approved by an authorized program sponsor. When accepted, the applicant will receive from the educational institution or program sponsors the necessary approval documentation to be submitted when applying for a visa.

The exchange visitor program’s J visa is designed to promote the interchange of persons, knowledge, and skills in the fields of education, arts, and sciences. Participants include students at all academic levels; trainees obtaining on-the-job training with firms, institutions, and agencies; teachers of primary, secondary, and specialized schools; professors coming to teach or do research at institutions of higher learning; research scholars; professional trainees in the medical and allied fields; and international visitors coming for the purpose of travel, observation, consultation, research, training, sharing, or demonstrating specialized knowledge or skills, or participating in organized people-to-people programs.

Dependents

Spouses or unmarried children under the age of 21 who wish to accompany or join the principal visa holder of a J-1 visa to the United States for the duration of his or her stay must have J-2 visas. Spouses or children who do not intend to reside in the United States with the principal visa holder, but who will visit for vacations only, may be eligible to apply for visitor (B-2) visas.

The spouse and/or child of an exchange visitor in the United States may not work while holding a J-2 visa unless they have filed Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) must have reviewed the Form I-765 and given permission to the J-2 holder to work. The USCIS website has a PDF document titled “Employment Authorization” that has more information.

Application Items

To apply for a J visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • Unless your J program is sponsored by the United States Government (with a program code beginning with a “G”), you must present a receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee, paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • An approved DS-2019 from your U.S. program.
  • Unless your J program is sponsored by the United States Government (with a program code beginning with a “G”), you must pay your Form I-901 SEVIS fee. The SEVIS website has more information.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one photograph taken within the last six months, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview:

  • Documents demonstrating strong financial, social, and family ties to your home country that will compel you to return to your country after your program of study in the United States ends.
  • Financial and any other documents you believe will support your application and which give credible evidence that you have enough readily-available funds to meet all expenses for the first year of study and that you have access to funds sufficient to cover all expenses while you remain in the United States.
  • Photocopies of bank statements will not be accepted unless you can also show original copies of bank statements or original bank books.
  • If you are financially sponsored by another person, bring proof of your relationship to the sponsor (such as your birth certificate), the sponsor’s most recent original tax forms and the sponsor’s bankbooks and/or fixed deposit certificates.
  • Academic documents that show scholastic preparation. Useful documents include school transcripts (original copies are preferred) with grades, public examination certificates (A-levels, etc.), standardized test scores (SAT, TOEFL, etc.), and diplomas.

Supporting Documents for Dependents

If you have dependents, you must also provide:

  • Proof of your relationship to your spouse and/or child (e.g., marriage and birth certificates).
  • Each spouse or child must have their own Form DS-2019. This form is used to obtain the visa required for the spouse/child to enter the United States with you as the principal holder of an exchange visitor visa, or to join you in the United States at a later date.

Transit/Ship Crew Visa

Overview

Transit (C visa)

A citizen of a foreign country traveling in immediate and continuous transit through the United States en route to a foreign destination requires a valid transit visa. Exceptions to this requirement include those travelers eligible to transit the United States without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program or travelers who are nationals of a country which has an agreement with the United States allowing their citizens to travel to the United States without visas.

If the traveler seeks layover privileges for purposes other than for transit through the United States, such as to visit friends or for sightseeing, the applicant will have to qualify for and obtain the type of visa required for that purpose, such as a B-2 visa.

Crew (D visa)

A crew member serving onboard a sea vessel or aircraft in the United States needs a crew visa. Crew members of an aircraft or ship that will be transiting through the United States or its waters generally use a combination transit/crew visa (C-1/D). However, in some cases, individuals may only require the D visa.

Crew members who work aboard vessels within the Outer Continental Shelf may qualify for a modified B-1 visa in lieu of a crew visa.

Qualifications

To apply for a transit visa, you must show:

  • Intent to pass in immediate and continuous transit through the United States.
  • A common carrier ticket or other evidence of transportation arrangements to your destination.
  • Sufficient funds to carry out the purpose of your transit journey.
  • Permission to enter another country upon departure from the United States.

To apply for other C, D or C-1/D visas, you must demonstrate to a consular officer that:

  • The purpose of your trip is to enter the United States solely for transit or crew purposes.
  • You do not intend to be paid by a U.S. source while in the United States, unless you have been granted proper approval for a temporary work visa.
  • You plan to stay for a specific, limited period of time.
  • You have evidence of funds to cover all expenses while in the United States.

Application Items

To apply for a transit or crew member visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • A receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee paid in local currency.This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • If applicable, a seaman’s book valid beyond the expiration date of your employment contract and all prior seamen’s books. Crew members must submit an official report of loss if they are unable to submit the book.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, and one photograph taken within the last six months, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Although supporting documents may assist you in your interview, consular officers rely primarily on the interview to determine your eligibility for a visa. In other words, supporting documents are voluntary and of secondary importance.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview:

  • Current proof of income, tax payments, property or business ownership, or assets.
  • A letter from your employer detailing your position, salary, how long you have been employed, any authorized vacation and the business purpose, if any, of your U.S. trip.
  • Where appropriate, an itinerary and/or other information about your planned trip. (This can be tentative.)
  • Bank savings account books or other evidence of liquid assets that indicate the balance in your accounts and account activity.
  • Real estate lease or deeds.
  • For crew: a letter from your company’s headquarters and/or your seamen’s book

Religious Worker Visa

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The R visa type is for individuals seeking to enter the United States to work in a religious capacity on a temporary basis, as defined in The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) §101(a)(15)(R).

Qualifications

Religious workers include persons authorized by a recognized entity to conduct religious worship and undertake other duties usually performed by authorized members of the clergy of that religion, and workers engaging in a religious vocation or occupation. You must meet the following criteria if you seek a religious worker visa:

  • You must be a member of a religious denomination recognized as a bona fide nonprofit religious organization in the United States.
  • Your religious denomination and its affiliate, if applicable, must be either exempt from taxation or qualify for tax-exempt status.
  • You must have been:
    a) a member of your denomination for the two years immediately preceding your application for religious worker status
    (b) planning to work as a minister of your denomination, or in a religious occupation or vocation for a bona fide, nonprofit religious organization (or a tax-exempt affiliate of such an organization )
    (c) residing and physically present outside the United States for the immediate prior year, if you have previously spent five years in this category.

There is no requirement that you have a residence abroad that you have no intention of abandoning. However, you must intend to depart the United States at the end of your lawful status, absent specific indications or evidence to the contrary.

Petitions

Your prospective employer must file Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker, with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). For more detailed information regarding the filing of Form I-129, as well as requirements, please refer to the USCIS R-1 Temporary Nonimmigrant Religious Worker web page.

Note: Prospective employers should file the petition as soon as possible (but not more than 6 months before the proposed employment will begin) in order to provide adequate time for petition and subsequent visa processing.

Your petition, Form I-129, must be approved before you can apply for a visa at the U.S. Embassy. When your petition is approved, your employer or agent will receive a Notice of Action, Form I-797, which serves as your petition’s approval notification. The consular officer will verify your petition approval through the Department of State’s Petition Information Management Service (PIMS) during your interview.

You must bring your I-129 petition receipt number to your interview at the U.S. Embassy in order to verify your petition’s approval. Please note that approval of a petition does not guarantee issuance of a visa if you are found to be ineligible for a visa under U.S. immigration law.

Application Items

If you apply for a religious worker visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • A receipt showing payment of your US$190 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • The receipt number printed on your approved I-129 petition. Please note that Form I-797 is no longer required for the interview.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one photograph taken within the last six months, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview:

  • A letter from an authorized official of the specific unit of your employing organization certifying that if your religious membership was maintained outside the United States, in whole or in part, that the foreign and United States religious organizations belong to the same religious denomination and that, immediately prior to your application for an R visa, you have been a member of the religious denomination for the required two-year period.
  • If you are a minister, that you are authorized to conduct religious worship for that denomination. The duties should be described in detail; or
  • If you are a religious professional, that you have at least a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent, and that such a degree is required for entry into the religious profession; or
  • If you are to work in a nonprofessional vocation or occupation, that you are qualified if the type of work to be done relates to a traditional religious function.
  • The arrangements for remuneration, including the amount and source of salary, other types of compensation such as food and housing, and any other benefits to which a monetary value may be affixed, and a statement whether such remuneration shall be in exchange for services rendered.
  • The name and location of the specific organizational unit of the religious denomination or affiliate for which you will provide services.
  • If you will work for an organization that is affiliated with a religious denomination, a description of the nature of the relationship between the two organizations.
  • Evidence of your religious organization’s assets and methods of operation.
  • Your organization’s papers of incorporation under applicable state law

Domestic Employee Visa

Overview

Personal or domestic servants who are accompanying or following an employer to the United States may be eligible for B-1 visas. This category of domestic employees includes, but is not limited to, cooks, butlers, chauffeurs, housemaids, valets, footmen, nannies, mothers’ helpers, gardeners, and paid companions.

Those accompanying or following to join an employer who is a foreign diplomat or government official may be eligible for an A-3 or G-5 visa, depending upon their employer’s visa status.

Qualifications

If you are a domestic employee and wish to apply for a B-1 visa, you must demonstrate that:

  • The purpose of your trip is to enter the United States for work as a domestic employee
  • You plan to remain in the United States for a specific, limited period of time
  • Your employer meets certain qualifications
  • You have evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad
  • You have a residence outside the United States as well as other binding ties that will ensure you return abroad at the end of your contract.

Accompanying a Nonimmigrant Visa Holder

If you are a domestic employee and wish to accompany or join an employer who is not a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident, and who seeks admission to, or who is already in, the United States under a B, E, F, H, I, J, L, M, O, P, Q, or R nonimmigrant visa then you may be eligible for a B-1 visa classification, provided:

  • You have at least one year’s experience as a personal or domestic employee as attested to by statements from previous employers
    • You have been employed outside the United States by your employer for at least one year prior to the date of your employer’s admission to the United States, or
    • Your employer-employee relationship existed immediately prior to the time of your employer’s application, and your employer can demonstrate that he or she regularly employed (either year-round or seasonally) domestic help over a period of years preceding the time their application
  • You will have no other work, and will receive free room and board and round trip airfare from your employer as indicated under the terms of the employment contract

Accompanying an American Citizen

A. Personal or domestic employees who are accompanying or following to join U.S. citizen employers temporarily assigned to the United States may be eligible for a B-1 visa classification provided that:

  1. The employee has a residence abroad which he or she has no intention of abandoning;
  2. The alien has been employed abroad by the employer as a personal or domestic servant for at least six months prior to the date of the employer’s admission to the United States OR the employer can show that while abroad the employer has regularly employed a domestic servant in the same capacity as that intended for the applicant;
  3. The employee can demonstrate at least one year experience as a personal or domestic servant by producing statements from previous employers attesting to such experience; and
  4. The employee is in possession of an original contract or a copy of the contract, to be presented at the port of entry, which contains the original signatures of both the employer and the employee.

B. The U.S. citizen employer is subject to frequent international transfers lasting two years or more as a condition of the job as confirmed by the employer’s personnel office and is returning to the United States for a stay of no more than six years.  The employer will be the only provider of employment to the domestic employee, and will provide the employee free room and board and a round trip airfare as indicated under the terms of the employment contract; and

C. The required employment contract has been signed and dated by the employer and employee and contains a guarantee from the employer that, in addition to the provisions listed in item (b) above, the employee will receive the minimum or prevailing wages whichever is greater for an eight hour work-day.  The employment contract must also reflect any other benefits normally required for U.S. domestic workers in the area of employment.  The employer will give at least two weeks’ notice of his or her intent to terminate the employment, and the employee need not give more than two weeks’ notice of intent to leave the employment

Accompanying a U.S. Legal Permanent Resident

U.S. Legal Permanent Residents (Green card holders) are not permitted to bring their domestic workers to the United States on a B-1 visa under any circumstances.

Contract Requirements for B-1 Visa Holders

As a domestic employee applying for a B-1 visa, you must present an employment contract, signed by both you and your employer, which includes:

  • A description of your duties in the United States
  • The number of hours you will work each week
  • The number of authorized holidays, vacation and sick days per year
  • The regular day(s) off each week
  • The rate of pay, which must be at least the prevailing or minimum wage per hour under Federal law (whichever is greater) in the State where you will be employed for all hours of duty. Current minimum wages throughout the United States are found here and currently prevailing wages can be found here.
  • A certification that you will receive free room and board
  • A certification that your employer will ensure that you do not become a public charge while working for your employer
  • A certification that you will not accept any other employment while working for your employer
  • A certification that your employer will not withhold your passport
  • A certification that both parties understand that you cannot be required to remain on the premises after working hours without compensation
  • A certification that your employer will pay your initial travel expenses to the United States and subsequently to your employer’s onward assignment, or to your country of normal residence at termination.

Accompanying an A-1, A-2, or G-1 – G-4 Visa Holder (A-3 or G-5 Visas)

If you are the attendant, servant, or personal employee of someone classified A-1 or A-2 or G-1 through G-4 then you are entitled to the appropriate A-3 or G-5 classification. You must demonstrate entitlement to an A-3 or G-5 classification (e.g., letter of reference from a former employer, evidence of previous employment in that sector, etc.). Consular officers must establish the official status of the employer and the intent of both parties to enter into (or remain in) an employer-employee relationship. In addition, domestic helpers of diplomats (A3) and international organization employees (G5) must first be registered with the Department of State’s Office of Foreign Mission Management Information System (TOMIS) before applying for a visa. For details of TOMIS registration please contact the U.S. Department of State’s Office of Foreign Missions.

A-3 and G-5 visa applicants must be interviewed by a consular officer. They must follow the normal application procedures with one exception: A-3 and G-5 visa applicants do not pay the visa application fee.

The consular officer must be satisfied that the wage to be received by the A-3 or G-5 applicant is a fair wage comparable to that offered in the area of employment and sufficient to overcome public charge concerns. Applications for such visas must include an employment contract signed by the employer and the employee.

Contract Requirements for A-3/G-5 Visa Holders (Click here to view a template of a B1 domestic employee work contract for the U.S.)

As a domestic employee applying for an A-3 or G-5 visa, you must present an employment contract, signed by both you and your employer, which includes:

  • A guarantee that you will be compensated at the state or federal minimum or prevailing wage, whichever is greater. Current minimum wages throughout the United States are found here and currently prevailing wages can be found here.
  • A statement that after the first 90 days of employment, all wage payments must be made by check or by electronic transfer to your bank account. Neither the employer nor their family members should have access to your bank accounts.
  • When the employer is a foreign diplomat, live-in domestic helpers, under prevailing practice, receive free room and board in addition to their salary
  • A promise by you not to accept any other employment while working for your employer
  • A promise by your employer to not withhold your passport and a statement indicating that both parties understand that you cannot be required to remain on the premises after working hours without compensation
  • The contract is essential to the process in that it provides you with a framework within which you may personally seek certain employment or human rights protections. Your employer must pay your initial travel expenses to the United States and subsequently to your employer’s onward assignment, or to your country of normal residence at the termination of the assignment.

Application Items

To apply for a B-1, A-3 or G-5 visa, you must submit the following:

  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) Form. Visit the DS-160 web page for more information about the DS-160.
  • A passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
  • One (1) 2″x2″ (5cmx5cm) photograph taken within the last six months. This web page has information about the required photo format.
  • For B-1 applicants only: A receipt showing payment of your US$160 non-refundable nonimmigrant visa application processing fee paid in local currency. This web page has more information about paying this fee. If a visa is issued, there may be an additional visa issuance reciprocity fee, depending on your nationality. The Department of State’s website can help you find out if you must pay a visa issuance reciprocity fee and what the fee amount is.
  • A copy of your employer’s visa or other method they will use to enter the United States (their Visa Waiver country passport or U.S. passport)
  • An employment contract, signed by both you and your employer, which meets all requirements listed above
  • For A-3 and G-5 applicants only: A Note Verbale confirming the employment status of the principal, the date of departure, the purpose of the trip and the length of stay in the United States. The Note Verbale should list the name of the employee and give the employer’s title or official status. It should also specify the date of departure, and the purpose of the trip and length of stay in the United States. A-3 and G-5 applicants are not required to pay application fees.

In addition to these items, you must present an interview appointment letter confirming that you booked an appointment through this service. You may also bring whatever supporting documents you believe support the information provided to the consular officer.

How to Apply

Step 1

Complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 2

Pay the visa application fee.

Step 3

Schedule your appointment on this web page. You need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:

  • Your passport number
  • The ref. transaction number from your bank receipt. (Click here if you need help finding this number.)
  • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
Step 4

Visit the U.S. Embassy on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring a printed copy of your appointment letter, your DS-160 confirmation page, one photograph taken within the last six months, your current and all old passports, and the original visa fee payment receipt. Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Supporting Documents

Supporting documents are only one of many factors a consular officer will consider in your interview. Consular officers look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors during adjudication. Consular officers may look at your specific intentions, family situation, and your long-range plans and prospects within your country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

Caution: Do not present false documents. Fraud or misrepresentation can result in permanent visa ineligibility. If confidentiality is a concern, you should bring your documents to the U.S. Embassy in a sealed envelope. The U.S. Embassy will not make your information available to anyone and will respect the confidentiality of your information.

You should bring the following documents to your interview:

  • Proof of your employer’s ability to pay the promised wage. Note: If you are applying for an A-3 or G-5 visa, this only applies if the employer holds a diplomatic rank of counselor or below.
  • Evidence establishing that your stay in the United States will be temporary.
  • Visit the Department of State’s website for more information.

Questions and Answers.

Q.1 How long does my passport have to be valid in order to apply for a U. S. visa?

You must possess a passport valid for travel to the United States with a validity date at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions).

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Q.2 Do I qualify for the Visa Waiver Program?

You qualify for the Visa Waiver Program if you are a citizen of a Visa Waiver Program country, possess a machine-readable passport, are traveling for temporary business or a visit of less than 90 days, meet other program requirements, and have obtained an authorization through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA).

You must be a citizen of a Visa Waiver Program-eligible country in order to use this program. Permanent residents of VWP-eligible countries do not qualify for the Visa Waiver Program unless they are also citizens of VWP-eligible countries. We recommend you visit the Visa Waiver Program website before any travel to the United States to determine if you are eligible for the VWP.

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Q.3 What is the fee for ESTA and who has to pay it?

ESTA registration is required for all travelers to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program. There is a US$14 fee for ESTA registration. The fee can be paid online using a debit card or any of the following credit cards: Visa, MasterCard, American Express, or Discover. Third parties (travel agents, family members, etc.) can pay your ESTA fee for you if you do not have the correct type of credit card. If the ESTA registration is denied, the fee is only US$4.

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Q.4 If I travel to the United States without ESTA, what happens?

Visa Waiver Program travelers who have not obtained approval through ESTA should expect to be denied boarding on any air carrier bound for the United States. If you are allowed to board, you can expect to encounter significant delays and possible denial of admission at the U.S. port of entry (i.e., arrival airport). ESTA registration usually only takes a few minutes to complete, authorization often arrives in seconds, and it is valid for two years, unless the traveler’s passport expires within that two-year period. In those cases, ESTA validity is limited to the passport’s validity.

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Q.5 If I am a third-country national living in Qatar, can I apply for a nonimmigrant visa in Qatar?

Applicants are generally advised to apply in their country of nationality or residence. Any person who is legally present in Qatar may apply for a visa in Qatar. However, applicants should decide where to apply based on more than just convenience or delay in getting an appointment in their home district. One thing to consider, for example, is in which consular district the applicant can demonstrate the strongest ties.

There is no guarantee that a visa will be issued, nor is there a guarantee of processing time. If refused, there is no refund of the application fee.

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Q.6 Do all nonimmigrant visa applicants have to come to the U.S. Embassy for an interview?

Yes, for most applicants. There are only a few exceptions to the interview requirement. The following applicants generally do not have to appear in person:

  • Applicants for A-1, A-2 (official travelers on central government business), C-2, C-3 (central government officials in transit on central government business) or G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4 (central government officials traveling in connection with an international organization, or employees of an international organization)
  • Children under the age of 14 if their parents have a valid nonimmigrant visa.

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Q.7 I have a nonimmigrant visa that will expire soon and I would like to renew it. Do I need to go through the whole visa application process again?

Each nonimmigrant visa application is a separate process. You must apply in the normal manner, even if you had a visa before and even if your current nonimmigrant visa is still valid.

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Q.8 My passport has expired, but the U.S. visa in it is still valid. Do I need to apply for a new visa?

No.  If your visa is still valid you can travel to the United States with your two passports (old and new), as long as the visa is valid, not damaged, and is the appropriate type of visa required for your principal purpose of travel.  (Example: tourist visa, when your principal purpose of travel is tourism).  Also, the name and other personal data should be the same in both passports. Your nationality, as indicated in the new passport, must be the same as that shown in the passport bearing the visa.

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Q.9 I have dual citizenship. Which passport should I use to travel to the United States?

If one of your nationalities is not American, you can apply using whichever nationality you prefer, but you must disclose all nationalities to the U.S. Embassy on your application form. U.S. citizens, even dual citizens/nationals, must enter and depart the United States using a U.S. passport.

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Q.10 How can I extend my visa?

The validity of a visa cannot be extended regardless of its type. You must apply for a new visa.

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Q.11 Must I submit my visa application form electronically?

Yes, you must complete the DS-160 and bring a printed copy of the DS-160 confirmation page with you when you go for your interview at the U.S. Embassy

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Q.12 What is “administrative processing?”

Some visa applications require further administrative processing, which takes additional time after your interview with a consular officer. You are advised of this possibility when they apply. This web page on the Consular Affairs website has more information about administrative processing.

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Q.13 How do I read and understand my visa?

As soon as you receive your visa, check to make sure all your personal information printed on the visa is correct. If any of the information on your visa does not match the information in your passport or is otherwise incorrect, please contact the issuing authority (i.e. the) immediately.

The expiration date of your visa is the last day you may use the visa to enter the United States. It does not indicate how long you may stay in the United States. Your stay is determined by the Department of Homeland Security at your port of entry. As long as you comply with the Department of Homeland Security decision on the conditions of your stay, you should have no problem.

Further information about interpreting your visa can be found at the Department of State’s Consular Affairs website.

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Q.14 My visa will expire while I am in the United States. Is there a problem with that?

No. You may stay in the United States for the period of time and conditions authorized by the Department of Homeland Security officer when you arrived in the United States, which will be noted on the I-94, even if your visa expires during your stay. You can find more information here.

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Q.15 What will happen when I enter the United States?

Your airline should give you a blank Customs Declaration form 6059B. Only one Customs Declaration is required for a family traveling together.

A visa does not guarantee entry into the United States, but allows a foreign citizen coming from abroad to travel to a U.S. port of entry and request permission to enter the United States. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials have authority to permit or deny admission to the United States, and determine how long a traveler may stay. At the port of entry, upon granting entry to the United States, the Customs and Border Protection officer will determine the length of stay permitted. Previously, travelers received a paper I-94 (record of admission) with this information. This process is now automated, with some exceptions. The traveler will be provided with a CBP admission stamp on their travel document that shows the date of admission, class of admission, and admitted-until date. Learn more on the CBP Website. If a traveler needs a copy of their I-94 for verification of alien registration, immigration status or employment authorization, it can be obtained from cbp.gov/I94. You can review information about admission on the CBP Website.

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Q.16 I did not turn in my I-94 when I left the United States. What should I do?

Previously, foreign travelers granted entry by CBP officials received a paper Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record). This process is now automated, with some exceptions.  If you received a paper Form I-94 or I-94W and failed to turn in your paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to the commercial airline or CBP when you departed the U.S., see the CBP Website for instructions. Do not send your paper Form I-94 or I-94W to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General.

If you received an admissions stamp in your passport instead of a paper Form I-94 when granted entry, the I-94 record was created electronically, and a paper copy was not provided to you. CBP will record your departure from the U.S. electronically. Learn more on the CBP Website.

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Q.17 I have questions on submitting my DS-160 and printing the confirmation page. Where can I go for more information?

Our call center is unable to provide assistance on the application form. Any inquiries on completing the DS-160 can be addressed on the following website.

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Q.18 I changed my name. Is my U.S. visa with my old name still valid?

If your name has legally changed through marriage, divorce, or a court ordered name change, you will need to obtain a new passport.  Once you have a new passport, the Department of State recommends that you apply for a new U.S. visa to make it easier for you to travel to and from the United States.

Q.19. What information do I need to provide about social media, while filling the DS160 form:

 

On May 31 2019, the Department of State updated its immigrant and non-immigrant visa application forms to request additional information, including social media identifiers, from most U.S. visa applicants worldwide. For more details please click here.

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FAQ – Visa Refusals

  1. What is Section 214(b)?
  2. How can an applicant prove “strong ties?”
  3. Is a denial under Section 214(b) permanent?
  4. Who can influence the consular officer to reverse a decision?

The United States is an open society. Unlike many other countries, the United States does not impose internal controls on most visitors, such as registration with local authorities. Our immigration law requires consular officers to view every visa applicant as an intending immigrant until the applicant proves otherwise. In order to enjoy the privilege of unencumbered travel in the United States, you have a responsibility to prove you are going to return abroad before a visitor or student visa is issued.

Q.1 What Is Section 214(b)?

Section 214(b) is part of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). It states:

Every alien shall be presumed to be an immigrant until he establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer, at the time of application for admission, that he is entitled to a nonimmigrant status.

Our consular officers have a difficult job. They must decide in a very short time if someone is qualified to receive a temporary visa. Most cases are decided after a brief interview and review of whatever evidence of ties an applicant presents. To qualify for a visitor or student visa, an applicant must meet the requirements of sections 101(a)(15)(B) or (F) of the INA respectively. Failure to do so will result in a refusal of a visa under INA 214(b). The most frequent basis for such a refusal concerns the requirement that the prospective visitor or student possess a residence abroad he or she has no intention of abandoning. Applicants prove the existence of such residence by demonstrating that they have ties abroad that would compel them to leave the United States at the end of the temporary stay. The law places this burden of proof on the applicant.

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Q.2 How can an applicant prove “strong ties?”

Strong ties differ from country to country, city to city, and individual to individual. Some examples of ties can be a job, a house, a family, a bank account. “Ties” are the various aspects of your life that bind you to your country of residence: your possessions, employment, social and family relationships.

Imagine your own ties in the country where you live. Would a consular office of another country consider that you have a residence there that you do not intend to abandon? It is likely that the answer would be “yes” if you have a job, a family, if you own or rent a house or apartment, or if you have other commitments that would require you to return to your country at the conclusion of a visit abroad. Each person’s situation is different.

U.S. consular officers are aware of this diversity. During the visa interview they look at each application individually and consider professional, social, cultural and other factors. In cases of younger applicants who may not have had an opportunity to form many ties, consular officers may look at the applicants specific intentions, family situations, and long-range plans and prospects within his or her country of residence. Each case is examined individually and is accorded every consideration under the law.

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Q.3 Is a denial under Section 214(b) permanent?

No. The consular officer will reconsider a case if an applicant can show further convincing evidence of ties outside the United States. Unfortunately, some applicants will not qualify for a nonimmigrant visa, regardless of how many times they reapply, until their personal, professional, and financial circumstances change considerably.

An applicant refused under Section 214(b) should review carefully their situation and realistically evaluate their ties. They may write down on paper what qualifying ties they think they have which may not have been evaluated at the time of their interview with the consular officer. Also, if they have been refused, they should review what documents were submitted for the consul to consider. Applicants refused visas under section 214(b) may reapply for a visa. When they do, they will have to show further evidence of their ties or how their circumstances have changed since the time of the original application. It may help to answer the following questions before reapplying: (1) Did I explain my situation accurately? (2) Did the consular officer overlook something? (3) Is there any additional information I can present to establish my residence and strong ties abroad?

Applicants should also bear in mind that they will be charged a nonrefundable application fee each time they apply for a visa, regardless of whether a visa is issued.

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Q.4 Who can influence the consular officer to reverse a decision?

Immigration law delegates the responsibility for issuance or refusal of visas to consular officers overseas. They have the final say on all visa cases. By regulation, the U.S. Department of State has authority to review consular decisions, but this authority is limited to the interpretation of law, as contrasted to determinations of facts. The question at issue in such denials, whether an applicant possesses the required residence abroad, is a factual one. Therefore, it falls exclusively within the authority of consular officers at our Foreign Service posts to resolve. An applicant can influence the post to change a prior visa denial only through the presentation of new convincing evidence of strong ties.

For information about visa ineligibilities other than 214(b), please visit the Department of State’s Consular Affairs website.

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FAQ – Business/Tourist Visa

  1. How long can I stay in the United States on a tourist or business visa?
  2. My visitor visa (B-1/B-2) expires after my intended date of arrival in the United States. Do I need to get a new visa before departure?
  3. My U.S. visa will expire in the next 6 months. Do I need to apply for a new visa after my current visa expires or can I apply in advance?
  4. I currently hold a valid B-1/B-2 visa, which is in my maiden name, in my old passport. I wish to transfer this visa to my new passport, which is in my married name. What is the procedure?
  5. My current U.S. visa was issued to me when I was working in my previous job. Now I have changed to a new job at a new company and my new employer wants me to attend a conference in the United States, scheduled for next month. Can I use the same visa or do I have to apply for a new visa?
  6. My child is studying in the United States. Can I go live with him?

Q.1 How long can I stay in the United States on a tourist or business visa?

A U.S. nonimmigrant visa grants you permission to travel to a Port of Entry (airport/seaport) in the United States. When you arrive at your destination Port of Entry, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer who processes your entry will determine the length of time that you may remain in the country. You may travel to the Port of Entry during the validity of your nonimmigrant visa up to and including the last day the visa is valid. The visa duration does not determine the length of time that you may legally remain in the United States; only the Customs and Border Protection officer can decide this upon your arrival in the United States.

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Q.2 My visitor visa (B-1/B-2) expires after my intended date of arrival in the United States. Do I need to get a new visa before departure?

You can arrive in the United States right up to the last date of validity indicated on the visa. The Customs and Border Protection officer on arrival determines the duration of your stay in the United States. Your visa can expire while you are still in the United States – just be sure that you do not overstay the period of time the officer grants.

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Q.3 My U.S. visa will expire in the next 6 months. Do I need to apply for a new visa after my current visa expires or can I apply in advance?

You do not have to wait until your current visa expires. You can apply for a new visa even if your current visa is valid.

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Q.4 I currently hold a valid B-1/B-2 visa, which is in my maiden name, in my old passport. I wish to transfer this visa to my new passport, which is in my married name. What is the procedure?

U.S. visas cannot be transferred from one passport to another. You can travel to the United States with both passports as well as your marriage certificate, or you can apply for a new visa.

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Q.5 My current U.S. visa was issued to me when I was working in my previous job. Now I have changed to a new job at a new company and my new employer wants me to attend a conference in the United States, scheduled for next month. Can I use the same visa or do I have to apply for a new visa?

You can travel to the United States on the same visa as long as your visa is valid for business or pleasure.

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Q.6 My child is studying in the United States. Can I go live with him?

While you can use your own B-1/B-2 visa (or travel under the Visa Waiver Program, if eligible) to visit your child, you may not live with your child unless you have your own immigrant, work, or student visa.

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FAQ – Work Visa

  1. What is a petition?
  2. Can I get a visa to do casual work?
  3. Is there an age limit for applying for a temporary work visa?
  4. Can my U.S.-based relative sponsor me for a work visa?
  5. When can I enter the United States?
  6. Who pays the Fraud Prevention and Detection fee and when do they pay it?

Q.1 What is a petition?

Before applying for a temporary worker visa at the U.S. Embassy you must have an approved Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker, from USCIS. This petition must be submitted by your prospective employer no earlier than 6 months prior to your proposed employment start date. Your employer should file the petition as soon as possible within the 6-month period to allow adequate time for processing. Once approved, your employer will be sent Form I-797, Notice of Action. For more information, visit the USCIS Temporary Workers webpage.

Note: To verify your petition’s approval the U.S. Embassy needs your I-129 petition receipt number, along with your approved Form I-797. Please bring both of these to your interview.

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Q.2 Can I get a visa to do casual work?

No. There is no visa that covers casual work. All applicants who plan to work in the United States must have an approved petition prior to their visa appointment.

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Q.3 Is there an age limit for applying for a temporary work visa?

No.

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Q.4 Can my U.S.-based relative sponsor me for a work visa?

No. Only your employer can sponsor you.

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Q.5 When can I enter the United States?

You may not enter the United States until 10 days prior to your initial employment start date, as noted on your Form I-797 or on your offer of employment letter.

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Q.6 Who pays the Fraud Prevention and Detection fee and when do they pay it?

An applicant for an L-1 visa traveling on a blanket petition must pay the Fraud Prevention and Detection fee. On individual L, H-1B and H-2B petitions, the U.S. petitioner pays the Fraud Prevention and Detection fee to USCIS when the petition is filed.

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FAQ – Student Visa

  1. What is an I-20 and how do I get it?
  2. How early should I apply for my student visa?
  3. I received my visa, when should I travel?
  4. Can a person on a visitor visa change his or her status to student while in the United States if he or she gains admission to a school and gets a Form I-20?
  5. What if I receive an I-20 to a different school?
  6. I was working as an H-1B and have now been admitted to a university as an F-1. Do I need to return to my country to apply for a student visa?
  7. Can an F-1 student work in the United States?
  8. What is the SEVIS system and how does it affect me?
  9. If I previously studied on a student visa in the United States (and that visa is still valid), do I need a new F-1 visa to return to the United States to attend a different school?
  10. When should I apply for student visa renewal?
  11. Can I renew my student visa in the United States?
  12. Can my brother/sister/mother/father accompany me to the United States as a dependent?
  13. I’m also a U.S. citizen. Can I get a F-1 student visa and/or can my husband/wife and children receive a F-2 dependent visa?
  14. Can I bring my maid on a visa with me to the United States if I’m going on a student visa?
  15. What if my F-1 visa expires while I’m in the United States?
  16. When must I renew my F-1 visa?
  17. How long can I remain in the United States on my student visa after I complete my studies?
  18. Can I enter the United States on my F-1 visa after the date of study listed on my I-20?
  19. What if the Embassy/Consulate keeps my passport, but I don’t hear anything for weeks? Is the visa still being processed?
  20. Can I go on vacation to Mexico and return to the United States to study on my F-1 student visa?
  21. If I change schools, do I need to get a new visa?
  22. My academic program is starting very soon but there are no more appointments available this month. What should I do?
  23. It is three days before the start date on my I-20 and my visa is still being processed. What should I do?
  24. I am already in the United States studying but my spouse would like to apply for a visa and join me here. What does she/he need to bring to the interview?
  25. I am an umarried female student going to study in the United States. Can my father (or my brother) receive a student visa to accompany me to the United States?
  26. Will my student visa still be valid if I do not travel when I originally intended to?
  27. If I want to go earlier than 30 days prior to the start date of my I-20, can I go on my tourist visa (B1/B2), leave the United States by crossing an international border, then come back into the United States on my student visa?
  28. If I transfer to another school or from English Language Study (ELS) to my university, how to I change the visa?
  29. My dependent spouse on an F-2 visa is thinking about studying in the United States. Does he/she need a different visa?
  30. Should I still come in for the visa interview if I don’t have my I-20 or SEVIS fee receipt?
  31. I want to switch schools. What should I do?
  32. My spouse and son/daughter are going with me. Will they have to pay the SEVIS fee too?

Q.1 What is an I-20 and how do I get it?

The Form I-20 is an official U.S. Government form, issued by a certified school, which a prospective nonimmigrant student must have in order to get an F-1 or M-1 visa. Form I-20 acts as proof-of-acceptance and contains the information necessary to pay the SEVIS I-901 fee, apply for a visa or change visa status, and be admitted into the United States. The Form I-20 has the student’s SEVIS identification number, which starts with the letter N and is followed by nine digits, on the upper right side directly above the barcode.

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Q.2 How early should I apply for my student visa?

You are encouraged to apply for your nonimmigrant student visa as soon as you have your I-20. To ensure you get an early and timely date you may apply at any time. However, a student visa may be issued no more than 120 days prior to the start date mentioned on your I-20.

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Q.3 I received my visa, when should I travel?

For your initial entry, you may only enter the United States within 30 days of the beginning of the course of study stated on your I-20, regardless of when your visa was issued.

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Q.4 Can a person on a visitor visa change his or her status to student while in the United States if he or she gains admission to a school and gets a Form I-20?

Yes. In general, you may apply to change your nonimmigrant visa status if you were lawfully admitted to the United States with a nonimmigrant visa, if your nonimmigrant status remains valid, if you have not violated the conditions of your status, and you have not committed any actions that would make you ineligible. For more details, please visit the USCIS website.

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Q.5 What if I receive an I-20 to a different school?

If you received an I-20 after scheduling your appointment, then you can inform the U.S. consular officer of the new I-20 at the time of the interview.

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Q.6 I was working as an H-1B and have now been admitted to a university as an F-1. Do I need to return to my country to apply for a student visa?

No. Once you are in the United States, you do not need to apply for a new visa because the visa is only for entry into the United States. Check with USCIS to determine if you need to adjust status. If you leave the country, however, you’ll need to apply for the student visa in order to re-enter the United States.

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Q.7 Can an F-1 student work in the United States?

Full-time students on F visas may seek on-campus employment not to exceed 20 hours per week. After the first year in student status, an applicant may apply for employment off campus with authorization from USCIS. Please contact your student advisor for further information.

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Q.8 What is the SEVIS system and how does it affect me?

The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) program requires schools and exchange programs to verify the enrollment status of all new and continuing foreign students and exchange visitors. Student visa applicants are required to pay a SEVIS fee before a visa can be issued. The SEVIS website has more details.

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Q. 9 If I previously studied on a student visa in the United States (and that visa is still valid), do I need a new F-1 visa to return to the United States to attend a different school?

No, students may enter the United States on an unexpired, valid F-1 visa even if they are attending a new school, as long as they have a valid SEVIS status.  Students attending a new school should obtain a new I-20 and must pay the I-901 SEVIS fee again.  Students only need to apply for a new visa if their visa has expired, been revoked or cancelled, or the student has changed visa categories.

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Q. 10 When should I apply for student visa renewal?

As soon as possible, but the earliest we can issue a student visa is 120 days before the start of your studies as listed on your I-20.  You may not need a new visa (see question 1).  If you do, it’s never too early to schedule an appointment.  You can even schedule your appointment while you’re still in the United States.  You do not have to wait until you return to your home country  to schedule your visa interview.

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Q. 11 Can I renew my student visa in the United States?

No. Visas can only be obtained at U.S. Embassies and Consulates abroad.

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Q. 12 Can my brother/sister/mother/father accompany me to the United States as a dependent?

Only your spouse and children (unmarried, under the age of 21) can accompany you to the United States as dependents, usually on F-2 visas.  If qualified, your close family members who don’t qualify for F-2 visas may be able to accompany you on a B1/B2 business/tourism visa.  However, their stay is generally restricted to six months and they would need to apply for an extension with the immigration service (USCIS) in the United States if they wish to stay longer.

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Q. 13 I’m also a U.S. citizen. Can I get a F-1 student visa and/or can my husband/wife and children receive a F-2 dependent visa?

No, a U.S. citizen cannot receive a visa to the United States.  U.S. citizens must enter and depart the United States using their U.S. passports.  The spouse and children of a U.S. citizen may not receive F-2 visas.  As a U.S. citizen you may file a petition to begin the immigration process of acquiring permanent residency for your spouse and children.

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Q. 14 Can I bring my maid on a visa with me to the United States if I’m going on a student visa?

No, we strongly discourage it.

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Q. 15 What if my F-1 visa expires while I’m in the United States?

You are free to remain in the United States for the period of time indicated on your I-94.  For students, this is typically indicated as “duration of status” which means that you may remain in the United States for the length of your studies.  However, if you depart the United States after your visa expires, or if your visa expires while you are abroad, then you will need to apply for a new visa to re-enter the United States.

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Q. 16 When must I renew my F-1 visa?

You must renew your F-1 visa if you decide to travel outside the U.S. and your current F-1 visa will expire before you re-enter the United States to continue your program. If this is the case, you will need to apply for another F-1 visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

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Q. 17 How long can I remain in the United States on my student visa after I complete my studies?

If you have completed your academic program and have not applied for another academic program, or post-graduation training, you can remain in the United States up to 60 days after your studies have ended.  During this time, you may travel around the United States, but you may not re-enter on your student visa once you have departed, even if it is within 60 days of completing your academic program.

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Q. 18 Can I enter the United States on my F-1 visa after the date of study listed on my I-20?

For your initial entry, you cannot enter after the date of study listed on your I-20.  If the start date on your I-20 has already passed, you will need to get a new I-20 with a start date in the future.

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Q. 19 What if the Embassy/Consulate keeps my passport, but I don’t hear anything for weeks? Is the visa still being processed?

While the majority of visas are processed within a few weeks, occasionally a visa will take longer to be issued.  While the processing is ongoing, you may take back your passport by sending an email, along with your passport number, to support-qatar@ustraveldocs.com .  When the processing is complete, we will contact you to send in your passport so that the visa may be printed

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Q. 20 Can I go on vacation to Mexico and return to the United States to study on my F-1 student visa?

If you travel to a contiguous territory (including Canada and Mexico) and are there for less than 30 days, you do not need to have a valid F-1 visa to re-enter the United States. You must be in valid F-1 status, have a valid I-20, an unexpired passport and a valid I-94. Please contact the Mexican Embassy and Canadian Embassy for information on visa requirements for those countries for citizens of your country.

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Q. 21 If I change schools, do I need to get a new visa?

If you change schools after you received your F-1 student visa, but before you make your first trip to the United States as a student, you will need to apply for a new visa. However, if you are changing schools after you have started your studies in the United States, you do not need to get a new visa. Please be sure to contact your student advisor at the old school to transfer your SEVIS registration to the new school. Before traveling to the United States to start a new school, please contact your student advisor to ensure that your SEVIS status is in initial or active status at the new school.

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Q. 22 My academic program is starting very soon but there are no more appointments available this month. What should I do?

Please make an appointment for the earliest available date on the appointment website, even if it is after the date you need to be in the U.S. At the end of this process you will be able to request and submit an emergency appointment. You must explain briefly what your emergency is, give your SEVIS number and I-20 start-date, and give two or three dates that are convenient for your to come in for an interview.

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Q. 23 It is three days before the start date on my I-20 and my visa is still being processed. What should I do?

Please contact your school and request an extension letter or a new I-20. Inform them that your visa is still being processed. When you receive your extension letter or new I-20, please send a copy to the Embassy/Consulate immediately. Please remember, visa processing cannot be expedited.

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Q. 24 I am already in the United States studying but my spouse would like to apply for a visa and join me here. What does she/he need to bring to the interview?

In addition to the standard required documents, your spouse should bring an I-20 (for dependents), a copy of your F-1 student visa and a copy of your marriage certificate.

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Q. 25 I am an umarried female student going to study in the United States. Can my father (or my brother) receive a student visa to accompany me to the United States?

For F-1 students studying in the United States only children under 21 and spouses qualify for accompanying F-2 status.  Other family members who wish to accompany the student must apply for a Business and Tourism (B1/B2) visa. This means that the family member will not be able to live in the United States for the full term of your F-1 visa, and must exit the country within the time given by the Customs and Border Protection officer. Most visitors on a B1/B2 visa are admitted for six months, after which they must depart or seek an extension from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS).

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Q. 26 Will my student visa still be valid if I do not travel when I originally intended to?

You must be in the United States by the start date on your I-20 for your visa to be valid.  If it is close enough to your start date you may show a letter of extension from your school at the Port of Entry or a new I-20 with a new start date.  You will need a new visa if the new I-20 has a different SEVIS number, or if you have missed the original start date by more than 4 months.

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Q. 27 If I want to go earlier than 30 days prior to the start date of my I-20, can I go on my tourist visa (B1/B2), leave the United States by crossing an international border, then come back into the United States on my student visa?

Yes.

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Q. 28.If I transfer to another school or from English Language Study (ELS) to my university, how to I change the visa?

You usually do not need to change the visa.  Make sure you have an updated and correct I-20 and that your designated school officials in both schools keep the SEVIS system updated.

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Q.29. My dependent spouse on an F-2 visa is thinking about studying in the United States. Does he/she need a different visa?

If they are studying fewer than 18 hours a week, they do not need to change status. If they are studying full time or more than 18 hours, they will need an I-20 and a change of status to F-1 by filing form I-539 with USCIS. This can be done in the United States.  However, if they leave the United States they will need a new visa to re-enter and should apply through standard procedures.

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Q.30 Should I still come in for the visa interview if I don’t have my I-20 or SEVIS fee receipt?

Yes, but doing so is likely to cause delays as it’s harder to conduct the visa interview without the I-20/SEVIS fee receipt.  Both are necessary for the visa to be issued.  Be prepared to answer questions about possible schools you’d like to attend and what your long term educational plans are.  Once you obtain your I-20 and SEVIS fee receipt, send them in as soon as possible the visa cannot be printed without them.

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Q.31 I want to switch schools. What should I do?

Before the interview: either bring in the I-20 for your new school, or inform the consular officer about the change during the interview.

After the interview: If the visa is not printed, inform the consular office and send the I-20 to us. If the visa is printed: check the SEVIS number. If it is the same, you do not need a new visa. If the SEVIS number is different, you will need a new visa and must reapply.

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Q.32 My spouse and son/daughter are going with me. Will they have to pay the SEVIS fee too?

No, but they do need their own I-20 showing dependent status so they can get F-2 visas. Contact your school for this.

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FAQ – Exchange Visitor Visa

  1. I received my visa, when should I travel?
  2. What is the SEVIS system and how does it affect me?
  3. What is the “two-year rule?”
  4. Can the two-year rule be waived?

Q.1 I received my visa, when should I travel?

Exchange visitors may only enter the United States within 30 days of the beginning of the program, as stated on your Form DS-2019, regardless of when your visa was issued.

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Q.2 What is the SEVIS system and how does it affect me?

The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) program requires schools and exchange programs to verify the enrollment status of all new and continuing foreign students and exchange visitors. Exchange visitor visa applicants are required to pay a SEVIS fee before a visa can be issued. The SEVIS website has more details.

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Q.3 What is the “two-year rule?”

The “two-year rule” is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H-1, L-1, K-1 and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H-1, L-1, K-1, or immigrant visa.

J-1 visa holders subject to the two-year rule are not permitted to remain in the United States and apply for an adjustment/change of status to a prohibited nonimmigrant status (for example, from a J-1 visa to an H-1 visa) or to apply for legal permanent resident status (Green Card) without first returning home for two years or obtaining an approved waiver. Whether you are subject to the two-year rule is determined by a number of factors, including your source of funding and your country’s “Skills List.” It is not determined by the amount of time you spend in the United States.

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Q.4 Can the two-year rule be waived?

Possibly. Only the Department of State’s Visa Office can grant waivers of the two-year rule. The Visa Office is also the final authority on whether you are subject to the rule, regardless of what is annotated in your passport. If you are subject to the two-year rule, you may be able to tourist visa or any other nonimmigrant visa except those noted above.

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FAQ – Transit/Ship Crew Visa

  1. I plan to stop in the United States for a day and take a flight to another country on the next day. Do I need to apply for C-1 visa or a B-1/B-2 visa?

Q.1 I plan to stop in the United States for a day and take a flight to another country on the next day. Do I need to apply for C-1 visa or a B-1/B-2 visa?

If you seek layover privileges for purposes other than transiting through the United States, such as to visit friends or for sightseeing, then you must qualify for and obtain the type of visa required for that purpose, such as a B-2 visa.

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FAQ – Religious Worker Visa

  1. I am applying for a religious worker visa, but do not have an approved petition. I have been to the United States previously with an R-1 visa and was not required to have the petition. Can I apply for an R-1 visa without the petition since I had an R-1 visa in the past?

Q.1 I am applying for a religious worker visa, but do not have an approved petition. I have been to the United States previously with an R-1 visa and was not required to have the petition. Can I apply for an R-1 visa without the petition since I had an R-1 visa in the past?

The requirement for an approved petition went into effect November 28, 2008. All applicants applying for an R-1 nonimmigrant visa are required to have an approved petition from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). For more information, please visit the USCIS website.

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FAQ – Track My Passport

  1. How will I get my passport back after the interview?
  2. What types of ID are acceptable as proof-of-identity?
  3. Can someone besides me pick up or receive delivery of my passport?

Q.1 How will I get my passport back after the interview?

Your passport will be available for pick up at the U.S. Embassy.

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Q.2 What types of ID are acceptable as proof-of-identity?

You must present an original government-issued photo ID.

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Q.3 Can someone besides me pick up my passport?

Yes. However, your representative – even in case of family members – must present the following in order to collect your passport:

If a representative is collecting your passport from the document collection office on your behalf – even in case of family members – the representative must present:

  • A government-issued photo ID for identification
  • White passport pickup ticket.

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FAQ – Immigrant Visas

  1. Immigrant visa applicant did not receive a packet of documents in a sealed envelope to take along, on the plane to the United States
  2. Process to determine if applicants visa was issued under the new paperless process
  3. Why are some people asked to hand-carry sealed envelope to the U.S. Port of Entry & some are not

Q.1 Immigrant visa applicant did not receive a packet of documents in a sealed envelope to take along on the plane to the United States.

 

The Department of State has begun electronic processing of some immigrant visa applications.  If either the National Visa Center or the embassy/consulate requires that you electronically submit your civil and financial supporting documents via the CEAC portal, then your visa was issued under the new electronic process.

Unless specifically informed by the embassy/consulate which interviewed you and issued the visa, you are NOT required to hand-carry a packet of documents in a sealed envelope to present at the U.S. port of entry. Be assured that your documents were transmitted electronically from the Department of State to the Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (DHS/CBP), the agency that inspects all immigrants entering into the country. When you arrive at Immigration Control at the U.S. port of entry, the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers will have access to all of the information required to process your entry into the United States.  This new electronic process will streamline the processing of your immigrant visa application and entry to the United States.

Q.2 Process to determine if applicant’s visa was issued under the new paperless process.

We request you to look at your visa.  If you do not need a packet of papers, your visa will have an annotation by the bottom right corner of your picture that says “IV DOCS in CCD”.  This indicates that your immigrant visa was issued under the new paperless process

Q.3 Why are some people asked to hand sealed envelope to the U.S.Port of Entry & some are not?

The electronic processing of some immigrant visa applications began in 2018. To convert all the different types of immigrant visas to electronic processing will take several years.  Until the process is complete, some immigrant visa holders will still need to hand-carry a packet of documents in a sealed envelope to the U.S. Port of Entry.  These individuals will NOT have the annotation “IV DOCS in CCD” printed in the lower right hand corner of their visa.

FAQ – Application Profile

  1. How do I reset my password?
  2. What should I do if I move to another country after I have registered my profile on ustraveldocs.com and did not apply yet for my visa, or if I want to submit a new visa application in another country than my previous application?

Q.1 How do I reset my password?

Click the Forgot Your Password? link at the bottom of this web page. Enter your email address in the Username field and click Submit. The email address you type must match the email address you used when you began your visa application. A new password will be sent to your email address.

Note: The email with your new password will come from no-reply@ustraveldocs.com. Some email applications have rules which filter unknown senders into a spam or junk mail folder. If you have not received your email notification, please look for the message in your junk and spam email folders.

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Q.2 What should I do if I move to another country after I have registered my profile on ustraveldocs.com and did not apply yet for my visa, or if I want to submit a new visa application in another country than my previous application?

You do not need to create another profile if it is also serviced by CGI. You can simply contact us through the Contact Us section on this website and share your passport number, UID or email address so we can retrieve and update your profile with the new country where you plan to apply for your US Visa.

If you are applying in a country that is not covered by CGI, you will be invited to create a new profile. As a reminder, MRV fee receipts paid in one country are non-transferable to the other country.

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Flight Services

Book Cheap Flights with BFD Global

Life is all about being open to new experiences. And, what better way to dive into a whole world of new experiences than to travel? Whether it’s to tick off places on your bucket list, learn, explore, reunite with family and friends, or simply enjoy some rest and relaxation, BFD Global Consultancy can help. With cheap flights available to hundreds of inspiring destinations, we can get you on the road … without burning a hole in your wallet.

Doesn’t matter which destination you choose for your next expedition global Consulting is here to assist and ensure you get a good flight deal. We understand the importance of accommodating our customer’s last-minute travel needs and requirements, which is why you can call us anytime, from anywhere to know more about available deals and book your flight both international and local

You can also book your flight tickets from anywhere through our state-of-the-art mobile apps. Our cutting-edge technology and user-friendly interface ensure a hassle-free online booking experience at every step. We make affordable travel accessible on all Android and Apple devices and offer dedicated customer support around the clock. From searching to planning vacations, you can count on us to make travel bookings easy!

Frequently Asked Questions on Our Flight Services

  • How to find the cheap flight deals?
  • Book flight in advance: With the right planning and the optimum use of time, you can avail a good deal on airline tickets. All you need to do is to book flights well in advance (at least 30 days in advance). With your departure date coming nearer, the airfare tends to rise.
  • Go for budget airlines: Thanks to the increasing number of budget airlines, you can now travel to your favorite destination for cheap. If you are not a luxury-seeking traveler, flying in budget airlines is the right option for you.
  • Use reward points: Redeeming reward points can make your flight cheap. What can be more gratifying than paying for your airfare with points you have earned on your previous journeys. You just need to sign up for an airline reward program and earn points each time you travel.
  • Negotiate with any BFD global travel agent: It’s true that online flight deals can get you a cheap flight, but there is also a high chance that a travel agent can find a better deal for you. Call center representatives have options to waive a few charges and customize the deal. All you need to do is to be patient while calling and you may end up getting an enticing airfare deal.
  • Be flexible with travel plans: You never know you can get better deals on online flight booking if you search for different dates. You can also avail better deals if you are flexible to change your destination. For instance, if you want to spend a holiday amidst serenity, you can choose another mountainous or beach destination in place of the one that has a high-ticket price.
  • Join a frequent flyer program: Several airlines run their frequent flyer program in which, you can earn points that can make you get cheaper tickets and upgrades. What’s more! You can join these frequent flyer program for free. You must read the rules and regulations carefully before joining any frequent flyer program.
  • Subscribe to email notifications: Reading every email that lands in your inbox is certainly a tiring job. However, by reading the mail that talks about saving your hard-earned money on flight tickets can be worthy. Through subscribing to email notifications and newsletters, you can get frequent information on deals and book accordingly.
  • Try paying in a different currency: It is a hack used by very few. Many a time, you can get tickets in cheap just by paying the airfare in a different currency. You should try paying in a different currency in which you find the tickets cheap.
  • Book with different airlines: Return flights are undoubtedly convenient and cheaper options. But there are chances that if you search for flights offered by other airlines- and be a tad flexible about the time- you can get a low-fare flight.
  • What are suggested days to find cheap flight tickets?

In general, the weekdays are cheaper in comparison to the weekends. Also, the first of the week can be a better time to get cheap flights in comparison to Thursday or Friday (many travelers prefer flying on Friday evening as well).

  • What is the pocket friendly months to book plane tickets?

The answer totally depends on the destination you are traveling to. During the peak tourism season of any destination, the ticket prices are on the higher side. Off seasons is the ideal time to travel however, you must ensure the climate condition must be suitable enough for the journey.

  • How far in advance should I book a flight to get good deals?

In general, you should book tickets at least 30 days in advance to get cost-effective ticket. If you are planning to visit during the peak season, it is advisable to book tickets 45-60 days in advance as airfare tends to rise with the ticking of the clock.

  • Which are the top budget travel destinations for 2021?
  • America
  • Asia
  • Europe
  • Africa
  • 36 States in Nigeria.
  • How to search for cheap flights right now?

Have to fly due to any urgency and looking for cheap flights right now? BFD Global Consultancy brings you cheap last-minute flights to tourist destinations around the world. Avail these last-minute flight deals and fly to your desired destination for cheap. With ample deals available to pick from, you can choose the one that suits you the best and travel without worrying about the budget. We keep on updating the airfares and offer you with numerous flight deals and information on the cheap flights right now to anywhere in the world. Browse from the extensive list of flights or call us anytime round the clock and ensure huge savings! Rest assured we are truly the BEST when it comes to Fast Delivery Services

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  • BFD TRAVEL AGENCY

By www.bfdglobals.com

At the BFD Global Consultancy, we believe in innovation and invention We have made a start-up that offers an all-inclusive service to customers all around the world. Specifically, our services include uni sex salon & day spa bringing holistic hair and beauty services to all. Our dealing includes specialist hairdressing [Textured | Afro | Black hair] to manicures, pedicures, waxing – using products that are kind to hair and skin. We take hygiene very seriously. Each styling unit has its own set of tools – sanitized after every client. And we are meticulous. Even the water flowing from our sinks is purified. Our cosmetics section provides everything you need from makeup to hair, Male and female grooming, to skin care, fragrance, quality human hairs with scheduled maintenance, body lotion, sun & tan, and online services. BFD global travel Agency: has a team of competent staff trained to handle all type of immigration services such as Business Visa, Student Visa, Tourist Visa transit visa, booking of affordable tickets both international airline and local airline we can render any kind our immigration consultation. BFD global cash solution: section is open to serve your financial transaction such as Cash deposit, withdraw and online cash transfer both local and international. BFD global logistics: renders various delivery services anywhere in Rivers State our delivery is quite reliable to handle all types of confidential deliveries sooner than you expect. BFD global Hospitably: Supplies well trained hospitality staff that suits your business such as Office boys and girls, Receptionist, waiters’ cleaners, land scaping technicians, pest control team etc. BFD global Communication: is keen towards providing all kinds of communication services such as  Sells of Good brand Mobile phones and their accessories  Laptops and their accessories  Cameras and their accessories  Mobile Repairs  Recharge Cards (wholesale and retail) for all networks We are 100% certified and trusted for providing customers with all our service support to ensure our customers get what they the best they deserve in every aspect. As a Global enterprise with endless services and departments, our customers are enabled to purchase or order for any service online and even perform an over-the-counter transaction. With eye-catching decors, 100% polite staffs, and durable services, we guarantee that a visit to BFD Global Consultancy would win your heart!

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